acupuncture

Acupuncture and Pregnancy

Posted by on Sep 27, 2013 in acupuncture, Blog | 0 comments

Acupuncture and Pregnancy

Having just come back from the birth of our second son, I’ve been thinking a lot about the ways that acupuncture has helped me through two pregnancies. Since becoming a mother, I have heard horror stories of the trials of pregnancy that other mothers have experienced, many of which I was able to avoid thanks to regular treatments.

For many women, the first indicator of a pregnancy is morning sickness. Some mothers have an even more severe form called hyperemesis. Acupuncture, especially frequent acupuncture, can calm the stomach and eliminate nausea, even in cases of hyperemesis. The real key is frequency. If a pregnant patient can make the time to come daily for several days, the results and relief will be quick (this is where our sliding scale comes in handy; you can feel better without going broke).

Headaches are another common complaint and often begin in the first trimester. Again, the key is frequency of treatment, but acupuncture is able to effectively reduce the prevalence of or eliminate these headaches all together. Next on the list of aches comes the hips and back. As the baby grows, the mother’s pelvis expands. Supporting ligaments are made loose and less stable. All of this results in pain, often described as sciatica. Depending on the severity of the pain and when the mother begins treatments, frequent treatment is not as important here. Most pregnant patients experience relief after one or two treatments and return only for maintenance as their symptoms return (also, what saved my hips and back during both pregnancies, was the Leechco All Nighter Total Body pillow; your significant other may not have room in the bed, but you will be much happier!). Later in pregnancy, acupuncture can help relieve heartburn, swelling, and dizziness. Is the baby presenting breech? Acupuncture can help with that as well. Overdue and hoping to avoid chemical induction? There are points for that.

What about after baby arrives? Acupuncture can help with milk supply, post partum anxiety and depression, aches and pains, c-section recovery, mastitis, and plugged ducts. We can even give you more sleep as you take a well deserved nap in one of our recliners.

Acupuncture is completely safe for both mom and baby. There are a few points which are not to be used while expecting, but any trained and licensed acupuncturist will know to avoid them during treatment. We firmly believe that pregnancy should be a joyful time.

So, if you’re expecting, congratulations! Now schedule an appointment so you can be sure to enjoy everything this time in your life has to offer.

 

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Patience with the Process

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in acupuncture, Blog | 0 comments

How many a man has thrown up his hands at a time when a little more effort, a little more patience would have achieved success.” -Elbert Hubbard

I have some bad news- acupuncture is not an overnight, one shot, miracle cure (I can hear your collective gasp through the computer). In fact, sometimes, acupuncture is not even a 10 treatment miracle or 20 treatment remedy. Acupuncture is a process.

One of the most beautiful things about acupuncture is that it treats the individual. But every individual is different (thankfully, because how boring would our lives be otherwise?) and so each patient responds to acupuncture in their own, unique way. For the lucky few, the healing from acupuncture is almost instantaneous. They come into our office barely walking or in horrific pain and leave dancing a jig. For most it takes a series, usually somewhere around 10, of treatments to experience relief. Then, there are the other patients that, it would seem, healing alludes. For these patients, I suggest patience.

More often than not, patients that are not experiencing great relief have a condition that has been troublesome for years. What has been building for years will not be gone in days. Sometimes, their bodies are just behind the curve; it takes longer for their system to accept the treatments and to begin to heal. Occasionally, a patient may engage in self sabotage, wittingly or unwittingly (i.e. “My back feels so much better, I’m going to go lift boulders!”). And sometimes (this may come as a shock), we are wrong. Maybe we have left out that one point a patient’s body absolutely needs. Maybe we have done too many needles or too few needles. Whatever the reason for delayed or slow progress, remain patient and do not give up hope. If the treatments you are getting are not resulting in progress, we can adjust. Maybe add more needles, take some away, use electrical stimulation, try point injection therapy, add herbs or homeopathics.

I heard a great analogy earlier today about progress and conditioning- when you decide to get in shape, you don’t work out once and be done, in shape for the rest of your life. It is a process, each work out building on the one before, making you stronger, faster, and healthier. Healing is also a process and acupuncture can play a vital role in improving your well being. Each treatment will build on the one before and sometimes adjustments are needed to help you feel your best.

So, don’t throw your hands up in despair if you feel like you’ve hit an impasse. Stay persistent, stay patient, and stay hopeful- healing is just around the corner. 

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How Much Better Could It Be?

Posted by on Sep 20, 2013 in acupuncture, Blog | 2 comments

Recently, I came across an article in Acupuncture Today reviewing a book, Evaluating the Economics of Complimentary and Integrative Medicine. The article goes in to more depth, but the big take away for me was the following: “The study followed patients and examined health outcomes as well as costs of acupuncture and costs of direct care. Direct healthcare costs over the next two years for the group receiving acupuncture totaled approximately $367 per patient, while direct healthcare costs for this same time period were approximately $515 per patient for the group receiving usual care only. Adding acupuncture to usual care at a cost of $319 per patient saved an average of $148 per patient (U.S. dollar amounts are estimates based on current values of UK pounds). If the investigators had included factors such as patient out-of-pocket costs and changes in work productivity, the savings may have been even more substantial. Namely, the addition of acupuncture to usual care could have accounted for a net savings of $370 per patient.” This is so encouraging for acupuncture (and the rest of the data bodes well for other fields of complimentary and alternative medicine).

But, this data could be even more impressive if, when evaluating the cost of acupuncture treatments, community acupuncture had been used in the price comparison. Imagine how much higher the savings would have been if the price of a treatment had ranged from $15-$45 instead of $85-$125?

 

Read the article. Read the book if you want. Come get affordable acupuncture and start saving money (and, more importantly, feeling better!).

 

http://www.acupuncturetoday.com/mpacms/at/article.php?id=32744

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How Acupuncture Works

Posted by on Sep 9, 2013 in acupuncture, Blog | 0 comments

How Acupuncture Works

By far the most common question we are asked at the clinic is, “How does acupuncture work?” While this is briefly addressed in our FAQ section, it is asked so frequently that it warrants its own post.

 

Traditional Chinese Medicine believes that our bodies are made of energy. This energy is contained in channels (or meridians). When there is an imbalance or blockage in our body’s energy, disease results. In this case, disease can mean a cold, pain, hormonal imbalance, fatigue; anything that brings you discomfort. Acupuncture needles are inserted at specific points (or combination of points) in order to restore balance.

 

Western medicine theorizes that acupuncture works in several ways: it affects endorphines and neurotransmitters, stimulates nerves, and/or creates therapeutic inflammation. These premises are all accurate and there is even some scientific data to back them up. However, these explanations fall short. Our go-to example is the point Urinary Bladder 67. Located at the outside corner of the nail on the last toe, UB67 is typically used for headaches, eye pain, etc. However, it has the additional function of helping to adjust the position of a breech baby. That is not a nerve, neurotransmitter, or endorphine. That has nothing to do with therapeutic inflammation. It is simply one of the beautiful things about acupuncture.

 

In short, no one really knows how acupuncture works, only that it does. And until a grand, unified theory on acupuncture is discovered, the explanations we do have will have to be enough.

 

If our appetizer sized portion of information on the workings of acupuncture has left you hungry, check out Between Heaven and Earth and The Web that Has No Weaver to sate your appetite. And, as always, visit our website or contact us with any of your questions!

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5 Things You Did Not Know About Dominic and Carly

Posted by on Sep 5, 2013 in acupuncture, Blog | 0 comments

5 Things You Did Not Know About Dominic and Carly

Yes, there is an “About Us” page on the website, but it contains all the boring, obligatory details about our education and whether or not we know what we are doing. This list is far more exciting and, hopefully, lets you all get to know us a little bit better.

 

1. Dominic and Carly met in Inquiry Skills (still don’t have any idea what that class was for) on the first day of high school and Carly decided immediately that she was going to marry Dominic. Dominic told Carly he first knew he liked her “when she was kicking him in the shins in American Government” (apparently kicking a boy in the shins is the best way to show him you want to marry him). They began dating that year and were together 10 years before getting married (they had been together so long that, when Dominic proposed, Carly’s response was “are you serious?”…before saying yes, of course).

 

2. Dominic brews his own beer and has for the last 7 years. It all began when he read about it on the internet and expressed a desire to brew beer at home (a small apartment). Several months later the entryway to the apartment was filled with hops and supplies, while the guest bath tub contained about 100lbs of grain. Since moving back to Fort Myers, Dominic has converted part of the garage into an electric brewing set up and serves homebrew from his homemade, 3 tap keezer (it is DELICIOUS, by the way).

 

3. Carly is deathly afraid of lizards; yes, you read that correctly, Carly is terrified of the little (and sometimes monstrous) brown lizards that run around everywhere. The fear is so strong that, one day while cleaning the back porch, Dominic scared a lizard in Carly’s general direction. Carly had recently injured her Achilles tendon and was in a large walking boot. Galen was about 7 months old at the time and in a walker between Carly and the outside door. As the lizard ran in her direction, Carly screamed, lept over Galen in the walker, and ran out the porch door, rolling her uninjured ankle in the process. Don’t feel bad about laughing, she knows it’s absurd.

 

4. Dominic is currently in the process of converting the yard into a sustainable food forest. Although in its beginning stages, the property is already producing strawberries, blueberries, mulberries, Jamaican cherries, and some tomatoes. He has planted several edible green bushes, avocados, pomegranates, peaches, kumquats, Chinese dates, loquats, and more. Carly loves being able to go into the yard with Galen and snack as they play. Dominic will happily answer any questions about the yard and permaculture in general (read that sentence as: Dominic will talk your ear off on the subject, so inquire at your own risk).

 

5. Dominic and Carly originally believed that community acupuncture was for hippies and communists (although there is nothing wrong with being a hippie or communist, those were not terms they identified with). They fell in to the pattern of many mainstream acupuncturists and complained that making acupuncture affordable “devalued the profession” as a whole. How wrong they were. While operating their exclusive, house calls only practice, Dominic and Carly found they had a lot of extra time on their hands (insert shocking fact that most people cannot afford $125 per treatment here) and decided to provide free, community style acupuncture to the volunteers and recipients at the Our Daily Bread food pantry in Lehigh (their church helps run the pantry). It was an amazing success and, in the 2.5 hours that they were there every other week, they often saw upwards of 30 patients each. The positive results were staggering and the patients truly seemed to enjoy being around one another and sharing in the benefits of treatment. It was in this environment that Dominic and Carly were able to put their passion for helping people to real use and realized that prohibitive pricing was “devaluing the profession,” not providing more people access to the benefits of treatment. It was from this experience that Good Medicine Community Acupuncture was born and it is how Dominic and Carly found their calling.

 

So, that’s us…mostly. There are still some pretty interesting stories, experiences, and bits of knowledge we have to share, so ask away!

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New Community Acupuncture of Fort Myers Flyers!

Posted by on Feb 18, 2013 in acupuncture, Blog | 0 comments

New Community Acupuncture of Fort Myers Flyers!

Our patients are awesome about spreading the word about Good Medicine Community Acupuncture in Fort Myers, and here’s a new way to do just that: new flyers!

If there’s a bulletin board, telephone pole, neighbor’s dog etc, near you that would look so much better telling people all about affordable acupuncture right here in Fort Myers, print up a few and spread the love! Or, grab a stack of ’em next time you’re in treating yourself to an acu-nap! Questions, suggestions, comments, etc always welcome in the comments below, or you can always hit us up on email at getpoked at fortmyerscommunityacupuncture.com . Thanks!

Click for a PDF version!

Click for a PDF version!

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